Changes to Rally Regulations from 1st January 2020

The Kennel Club has recently approved the following changes to the regulations for rally which will come into effect on 1 January 2020.The following regulations have been amended in order to address minor issues and anomalies arising from the review of the S Regulations, and to provide consistency and clarity.New Regulation S19.h. JudgingTO:Judges must submit course plans to the Secretary and/or the Chief Steward no later than 10 days prior to the competition date.(Insertion in bold)(Subsequent paragraphs to be renumbered)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S2.b.TO:b. Only dogs of six calendar months of age and over on the first day of the competition are eligible to take part in Level 1, 2, or 3 and Level 2 classes. Only dogs of 12 calendar months of age and over on the first day of the competition are eligible to take part in Level 3 4 or higher classes or special classes which incorporate jumps or similar exercises.(Insertions in bold. Deletions struck through)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S15.a.TO:Facilities and Equipment .It is the competition organiser’s responsibility to provide the following:

  1. Information to the judge as soon as possible after the closing of entries concerning the number of entries, Exercise Modification Forms, the height of the dogs (for Level 3 4 and above), proposed ring size, and venue surface.

(Deletion struck through. Insertion in bold.)(Effective 1 January 2020.)Amendment to Regulation S21.h.TO:Dogs must compete in a buckle or snap collar. Collars may have tags on them. Decorations and/or costumes, harnesses, slip leads, check and half-check collars are not allowed. A medicated collar may also be worn in the ring.(Insertion in bold.)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S(A)2. EligibilityTO:When entered for a competition in a standard class, a dog must be entered at the level for which it is eligible. The dog may also, if desired, be entered in up to two additional classes, one further standard class at the subsequent higher level, one additional special class, or two additional special classes. A dog may be entered in special classes only, up to a maximum of 3 classes. Special classes do not count towards progression. Once a dog has gained any level or excellent title, it is no longer eligible for any lower level.(Insertion in bold)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S(C) 56. SIT LEAVE DOG – RECALL OVER JUMP.TO:This exercise requires two signs. At the first sign (A) the handler and dog stop with the dog sitting at heel. The jump must be approximately 4 metres from sign (A). The handler cues the dog to wait then walks to the second sign (B) which is approximately 4 metres away from the opposite side of the jump. The handler turns and faces the dog and recalls the dog. The dog must come over the jump and sit in front of the handler. The handler then cues the dog to Finish either Right or Left.(Insertion in bold)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S(C) 66. SIT – LEAVE DOG – ANGLED RECALL OVER JUMP.TO:This exercise requires two signs. At the first sign (A) the handler and dog stop with the dog sitting at heel. The jump must be approximately 4 metres from sign (A). The handler cues the dog to wait then walks to the second sign (B) which is placed approximately 4 metres away from the jump and 1 metre to either the right or left of the jump. The handler turns and faces the dog and cues the dog to jump. The dog must come over the jump and sit straight in front of the handler. The handler then cues the dog to Finish either Right or Left.(Insertion in bold)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S(B)3.i.Bonus ExerciseTO:The Bonus Exercise is an optional exercise. Handlers are not required to perform the Bonus Exercise, but must advise the judge at the Start Line if they wish to do so…(Deletion struck through)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S(B)2TO:(2) Once used, an exercise should not be repeated, with the exception of right and left turns and normal pace.(Insertion in bold)
(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S(C) Sign17TO:NORMAL PACE. As the dog/handler team draw level with the sign they move forward at a normal pace that is comfortable for the dog and handler.NB: at Levels 1 and 2 this is a separate exercise but at Level 3 or above the change in pace and return to normal pace is judged as one complete exercise.(Deletion struck through)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S(C)59TO:59. SEND OVER JUMP – HANDLER RUNS BY. As the handler and dog team approach the sign the handler sends the dog towards the jump which is approximately 4 metres in front of and 1.5 metres to the left of their path. The handler continues at a brisk pace along a line 1.5 metres to the right of the jump. When the dog has completed the jump, the handler calls the dog to the heel position and the dog/handler team continues to the return to their normal pace as they heel towards the next exercise approximately 4 metres ahead. If the dog is much faster than the handler, the dog may be called back to the handler without penalty. A line may be drawn on the ground to indicate the 1.5 metres mark. NB. This sign is now placed on the handler’s right, not on their left where it was previously placed.(Deletion struck through. Insertion in bold)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S(B)3.a.TO:a. Sign PlacementSigns must be placed so that they are on the handler’s right with the following exceptions:(2) Straight figure 8, distraction exercises, Spiral Left, Serpentine, and Side Step Right and Send Over Jump signs are placed so that they are on the handler’s left.(Deletion struck through. Insertion in bold)(Effective 1 January 2020)The below regulations were amended to permit food and toy rewards in Special classes when detailed in the schedule.Amendment to Regulation S5.b.TO:b. Special Classes

  1. A competition host may in addition stage one or more special classes not conforming to the standard class tests set out in Annex C. Such classes must contain the word ‘Special’ in the title of the class, and shall not count towards progression, titles or awards in standard competition classes.
  2. Special classes may allow the use of food and/or silent toy rewards in the ring, but their use must be detailed in the schedule. Reward areas should be clearly defined and allow the use of both food and toys. Food should be carried in a sealed container and toys should be carried concealed, alternatively the reward may be left in the reward area in a sealed container.
  3. Where special classes allow the use of food and/or silent toys their use should not impact competitors in other rings.
  4. Where a ring is to be shared between a standard class and a special class which allows food and/or silent toys, the standard class must be scheduled first to ensure that the ring does not contain food.

(Insertions in bold)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S21.f.TO:f. Food shall not be carried or given to a dog under test, except in special classes where the use of food and/or silent toy rewards has been specified in the Schedule.(Insertion in bold)(Effective 1 January 2020)Amendment to Regulation S21.g.TO:g. The use of a toy as an incentive in the ring between or during exercises is prohibited in all standard and special classes, except in those special classes where the use of food and/or silent toy rewards has been specified in the Schedule.(Insertion in bold)(Effective 1 January 2020)The below regulation has been amended in the interests of clarity, to reflect the principle that exercises should be standalone, and would not impinge on any other exercise.Amendment to Regulation S(B)2TO:

  1. All exercises stand alone (except where two exercises are linked). The positioning of exercises should be planned carefully to ensure that one does not impact on another.
  2. Courses should be designed so that the route between exercises does not transit other exercises. Competitors may only be required to pass through cone and distraction exercises when performing that particular exercise.
  3. Sometimes it may be necessary for competitors to pass a Distraction or Jump exercise – where this is unavoidable these exercises should be on the handler’s right.

The Kennel Club has recently approved the following changes to the regulations for rally which will come into effect on 1 January 2020.

The following regulations have been amended in order to address minor issues and anomalies arising from the review of the S Regulations, and to provide consistency and clarity.

New Regulation S19.h. Judging

TO:

Judges must submit course plans to the Secretary and/or the Chief Steward no later than 10 days prior to the competition date.

(Insertion in bold)

(Subsequent paragraphs to be renumbered)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S2.b.

TO:

b.   Only dogs of six calendar months of age and over on the first day of the competition are eligible to take part in Level 1, 2, or 3 and Level 2 classes. Only dogs of 12 calendar months of age and over on the first day of the competition are eligible to take part in Level 3 4 or higher classes or special classes which incorporate jumps or similar exercises.

(Insertions in bold. Deletions struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S15.a.

TO:

Facilities and Equipment .It is the competition organiser’s responsibility to provide the following:

  1. Information to the judge as soon as possible after the closing of entries concerning the number of entries, Exercise Modification Forms, the height of the dogs (for Level 3 4 and above), proposed ring size, and venue surface.

(Deletion struck through. Insertion in bold.)

(Effective 1 January 2020.)

Amendment to Regulation S21.h.

TO:

Dogs must compete in a buckle or snap collar. Collars may have tags on them. Decorations and/or costumes, harnesses, slip leads, check and half-check collars are not allowed. A medicated collar may also be worn in the ring.

(Insertion in bold.)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S(A)2. Eligibility

TO:

When entered for a competition in a standard class, a dog must be entered at the level for which it is eligible. The dog may also, if desired, be entered in up to two additional classes, one further standard class at the subsequent higher level, one additional special class, or two additional special classes. A dog may be entered in special classes only, up to a maximum of 3 classes. Special classes do not count towards progression. Once a dog has gained any level or excellent title, it is no longer eligible for any lower level.

(Insertion in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S(C) 56. SIT LEAVE DOG – RECALL OVER JUMP.

TO:

This exercise requires two signs. At the first sign (A) the handler and dog stop with the dog sitting at heel. The jump must be approximately 4 metres from sign (A). The handler cues the dog to wait then walks to the second sign (B) which is approximately 4 metres away from the opposite side of the jump. The handler turns and faces the dog and recalls the dog. The dog must come over the jump and sit in front of the handler. The handler then cues the dog to Finish either Right or Left.

(Insertion in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S(C) 66. SIT – LEAVE DOG – ANGLED RECALL OVER JUMP.

TO:

This exercise requires two signs. At the first sign (A) the handler and dog stop with the dog sitting at heel. The jump must be approximately 4 metres from sign (A). The handler cues the dog to wait then walks to the second sign (B) which is placed approximately 4 metres away from the jump and 1 metre to either the right or left of the jump. The handler turns and faces the dog and cues the dog to jump. The dog must come over the jump and sit straight in front of the handler. The handler then cues the dog to Finish either Right or Left.

(Insertion in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S(B)3.i.Bonus Exercise

TO:

The Bonus Exercise is an optional exercise. Handlers are not required to perform the Bonus Exercise, but must advise the judge at the Start Line if they wish to do so

(Deletion struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S(B)2

TO:

(2) Once used, an exercise should not be repeated, with the exception of right and left turns and normal pace.

(Insertion in bold)
(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S(C) Sign17

TO:

NORMAL PACE. As the dog/handler team draw level with the sign they move forward at a normal pace that is comfortable for the dog and handler.

NB: at Levels 1 and 2 this is a separate exercise but at Level 3 or above the change in pace and return to normal pace is judged as one complete exercise.

(Deletion struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S(C)59

TO:

59. SEND OVER JUMP – HANDLER RUNS BY.  As the handler and dog team approach the sign the handler sends the dog towards the jump which is approximately 4 metres in front of and 1.5 metres to the left of their path. The handler continues at a brisk pace along a line 1.5 metres to the right of the jump. When the dog has completed the jump, the handler calls the dog to the heel position and the dog/handler team continues to the return to their normal pace as they heel towards the next exercise approximately 4 metres ahead. If the dog is much faster than the handler, the dog may be called back to the handler without penalty. A line may be drawn on the ground to indicate the 1.5 metres mark.  NB. This sign is now placed on the handler’s right, not on their left where it was previously placed.

(Deletion struck through. Insertion in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S(B)3.a.

TO:

a.   Sign Placement

Signs must be placed so that they are on the handler’s right with the following exceptions:

(2)  Straight figure 8, distraction exercises, Spiral Left, Serpentine, and Side Step Right and Send Over Jump signs are placed so that they are on the handler’s left.

(Deletion struck through. Insertion in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

The below regulations were amended to permit food and toy rewards in Special classes when detailed in the schedule.

Amendment to Regulation S5.b.

TO:

b.    Special Classes

  1. A competition host may in addition stage one or more special classes not conforming to the standard class tests set out in Annex C.  Such classes must contain the word ‘Special’ in the title of the class, and shall not count towards progression, titles or awards in standard competition classes.
  2. Special classes may allow the use of food and/or silent toy rewards in the ring, but their use must be detailed in the schedule. Reward areas should be clearly defined and allow the use of both food and toys. Food should be carried in a sealed container and toys should be carried concealed, alternatively the reward may be left in the reward area in a sealed container.
  3. Where special classes allow the use of food and/or silent toys their use should not impact competitors in other rings. 
  4. Where a ring is to be shared between a standard class and a special class which allows food and/or silent toys, the standard class must be scheduled first to ensure that the ring does not contain food.

(Insertions in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S21.f.

TO:

f.   Food shall not be carried or given to a dog under test, except in special classes where the use of food and/or silent toy rewards has been specified in the Schedule.

(Insertion in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation S21.g.

TO:

g.  The use of a toy as an incentive in the ring between or during exercises is prohibited in all standard and special classes, except in those special classes where the use of food and/or silent toy rewards has been specified in the Schedule. 

(Insertion in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

The below regulation has been amended in the interests of clarity, to reflect the principle that exercises should be standalone, and would not impinge on any other exercise.

Amendment to Regulation S(B)2

TO:

  1. All exercises stand alone (except where two exercises are linked). The positioning of exercises should be planned carefully to ensure that one does not impact on another.
  2. Courses should be designed so that the route between exercises does not transit other exercises. Competitors may only be required to pass through cone and distraction exercises when performing that particular exercise.
  3. Sometimes it may be necessary for competitors to pass a Distraction or Jump exercise – where this is unavoidable these exercises should be on the handler’s right.

(Insertions in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

The below regulation has been amended to provide clarity to competitors.

Amendment to Regulation S(C) Bonus Exercise 5

TO:

SIT – LEAVE DOG – TURN – RECALL – HANDLER FINISH

This exercise requires two signs.  At the first sign (A) the handler and dog stop with the dog sitting at heel.  The handler may take the lead off or the dog may drag the lead.  The handler walks to the second sign (B), which is placed approximately 2 metres from sign A, turns and recall the dog to the front position.  The dog remains in the sit whilst the handler moves left to take up the heel position. This is not a walk around exercise. 

NB: If this bonus is used at Level 3 or above there is no requirement to reattach the lead before attempting the bonus exercise.

(Insertion in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

The below regulation has been amended to correct an inconsistency between this regulation, S(C)21 and S(C)49.

Amendment to Regulation S(B)3.a.(2) RING MANAGEMENT

TO:

a. Sign Placement

Signs must be placed so that they are on the handler’s right with the following exceptions:

(1)  Turns and Pivots may be placed directly in the handler’s path.

(2)  Side Step Right should be placed in the handler’s path

(2) (3) Straight Figure 8, distraction exercises, Spiral Left,  and Serpentine, Side Step Right, signs are placed so that they are on the handler’s left

(Insertions in bold. Deletions struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

(Insertions in bold)(Effective 1 January 2020)The below regulation has been amended to provide clarity to competitors.Amendment to Regulation S(C) Bonus Exercise 5TO:SIT – LEAVE DOG – TURN – RECALL – HANDLER FINISHThis exercise requires two signs. At the first sign (A) the handler and dog stop with the dog sitting at heel. The handler may take the lead off or the dog may drag the lead. The handler walks to the second sign (B), which is placed approximately 2 metres from sign A, turns and recall the dog to the front position. The dog remains in the sit whilst the handler moves left to take up the heel position. This is not a walk around exercise.NB: If this bonus is used at Level 3 or above there is no requirement to reattach the lead before attempting the bonus exercise.(Insertion in bold)(Effective 1 January 2020)The below regulation has been amended to correct an inconsistency between this regulation, S(C)21 and S(C)49.Amendment to Regulation S(B)3.a.(2) RING MANAGEMENTTO:a. Sign PlacementSigns must be placed so that they are on the handler’s right with the following exceptions:(1) Turns and Pivots may be placed directly in the handler’s path.(2) Side Step Right should be placed in the handler’s path(2) (3) Straight Figure 8, distraction exercises, Spiral Left, and Serpentine, Side Step Right, signs are placed so that they are on the handler’s left(Insertions in bold. Deletions struck through)(Effective 1 January 2020)

KC Announces Obedience Changes from 1st January 2020

The Kennel Club has recently approved the following changes to the regulations for obedience which will come into effect on 1 January 2020.

The below regulation has been amended in order to assist clubs in areas of the country where entries are low, by allowing stewards to compete. It is hoped this would ease the burden on some clubs in trying to find both judges and stewards from a small pool of people.

Amendment to Regulation G30.h.

TO:

Judges should whenever possible, provide their own Caller Stewards, but the Show Management shall provide any Caller Stewards if necessary. Caller and Scribe Stewards used by judges at the show must not work a dog on the same day., with the exception that at a show with 6 scheduled classes or less, caller and scribe stewards may compete in one class, other than the class in which they are officiating, provided that the class has 20 entries or less. Caller and scribe stewards taking up this option will be exempt from any running order and may compete at a convenient time agreed by the judges concerned.

(Deletion struck through. Insertion in bold).

(Effective 1 January 2020)

The below regulation has been amended to introduce a more gradual qualification for judges leading to their judging the higher classes, in order to ensure they had sufficient experience to do so.

Amendment to Regulation G32.e.

TO:

A Judge’s first three appointments for shows must be restricted to Novice.

The next three appointments must be up to and including Class A.

Before accepting an Open Class C appointment, a Judge must have completed at least a further nine appointments. These must include a minimum of three Class A and three Class B appointments. It is the individual’s responsibility to retain proof of their judging appointments.

(Insertions in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

The below regulation has been amended to give handler an opportunity to gain more experience in the lower classes before progressing.

Amendment to Regulation G(A)6.a.

TO:

  1. To compete in Pre-Beginners a handler or dog must not have won two a First places in either Pre-Beginners or Beginners nor gained a third place or above in any other Obedience class (Introductory Class excepted).

(Insertions in bold. Deletions struck through.)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

The below regulation has been amended as it is felt that it would be helpful for competitors to see details of timed stays beforehand, especially for those competing with multiple dogs as it would allow them to plan their day in advance.

Amendment to Regulation G30.g.

TO:

Where timed stays will take place it must be announced in the schedule that they take priority over other tests. The times of such tests to be published at the show and in the catalogue, if available, and may also be published with running orders. Published stay times must not be changed, except in exceptional circumstances at the discretion of the show management. In the case of Championship Class C stays must not be judged before 12 noon. In all other cases, timed stays must not commence before one hour after the published time for the commencement of judging.

(Insertions in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

The below regulations have been amended to allow for the use of diagonal turns in fast pace in Class B and Class C. This will add further scope for judges when setting rounds.

Amendment to Regulation G(C)4.e.(3)

TO:

Class B. In this class at normal and slow pace the only permissible turns are turns of 90° to the left or right, 180° about turns to the right or the left and diagonal turns to the right and left. Medium or large circles and arcs can be included. At fast-pace the only permissible turns are turns of 90° to the left or right, diagonal turns to the right and 180° about turns to the right. Medium or large circles and arcs can be included.

(Insertion in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

Amendment to Regulation G(C)4.e.(4)(i)

TO:    

Class C (i) Permitted turns

At normal and slow pace the permissible turns are 90° to the left or right, 180° about turns to the left or right, diagonal turns to the left or right, and circles or arcs. At fast pace, the only permissible turns are 90° to the left or right, diagonal turns to the right and 180° about turns to the right, and circles or arcs.

(Insertion in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2020)

OBEDIENCE LIAISON COUNCIL MEETING 6 FEBRUARY 2020

The next meeting of the Kennel Club Obedience Liaison Council will be held at the Kennel Club in London on Thursday 6 February 2020. Proposals for inclusion on the agenda should reach the Obedience Liaison Council Secretary by November 8.

Each eligible society or an individual may submit items for the agenda, through a council representative. Proposals must be concise and, if an amendment or an additional regulation is proposed, the regulation number must be given. All submissions must be signed by the society/individual and the representative.

All items for inclusion on the agenda should be sent to Working Dog Activities Team, The Kennel Club, Clarges Street, London W1J 8AB or by email to obedience@thekennelclub.org.uk.

A full list of Obedience Liaison Council representatives can be found at bit.ly/2Tx8YVk.

KENNEL CLUB URGES EXHIBITORS TO HAVE THEIR SAY ON ANIMAL EXHIBIT REGULATIONS IN WALES

The newly proposed Regulations could impact on thousands of responsible dog owners pursuing their hobby in Wales

The Kennel Club is urging dog show exhibitors from across the UK to write to the Welsh Government to prevent thousands of people who show dogs in Wales being caught in a newly proposed licensing system.

The Welsh Government is currently consulting on new Regulations regarding Animal Exhibits, including the proposal that anyone exhibiting an animal in Wales will need to be licensed and inspected. This will apply not only to those who live in Wales, but any exhibitor who shows dogs at any Welsh show. The Regulations will also require anyone who lives in Wales and exclusively exhibits their dogs outside of Wales to also obtain a licence and be inspected.

Although those competing in canine activity disciplines are exempt, the proposed amendment to the Animal Welfare Act in Wales would affect a huge number of dog show exhibitors; there are around 200 local dog shows that take place in Wales annually, as well as two major shows run by the Welsh Kennel Club and the South Wales Kennel Association. The Welsh Kennel Club show attracts around 9,000 dogs. 

Seeking support from dog show exhibitors to exempt themselves from the licensing system, the Kennel Club has drafted guidelines to assist those who would be affected and wish to respond to the consultation, which closes on November 21.

Holly Conway, Head of Public Affairs at the Kennel Club, said: “This proposal is a real concern for exhibitors who benefit so much from their hobby and canine companionship. It’s nonsensical for these responsible dog owners to be licensed, and inspected, simply for continuing to pursue a hobby, and is a waste of valuable local authority time and resource. We sincerely hope the Welsh Government will listen to these concerns and consider exempting those who take part in dog shows from the Regulations.

“We urge anyone who shows dogs, regardless of whether or not they live in Wales, to support us in preventing this proposal applying to dog show exhibitors by responding to the consultation and writing to their Assembly Member or indeed their MP or MSP.”

Further information and a template response for exhibitors to send to the Welsh Government to outline their concerns can be found on the Kennel Club website at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/welshcon.

New all-In-One test for multiple genetic disorders launched by the Kennel Club AND WEATHERBYS

The Kennel Club and Weatherbys are pleased to announce they have partnered to provide a simplified process for canine genetic heath testing which will benefit both dog breeders and owners, helping to eradicate some of the most concerning genetic disorders facing certain breeds.

CombiBreed™ health test packages simplify the process of genetic testing by using a single cheek swab to check a dog’s DNA for markers associated with a number of different inherited disorders. By making genetic testing more accessible it will help responsible breeders work towards eradicating these conditions and will encourage first time breeders to make the health of the puppies they breed a priority. Results from these tests will automatically be registered on the dog’s record, and will be freely available on the Kennel Club website, allowing puppy buyers to check if the dog they are thinking of buying has come from health tested parents.

Currently available for 13 pedigree breeds, breeders will be able to order breed specific CombiBreed™ health test packages directly from The Kennel Club Shop, from the 26th July, as well as at Kennel Club shows and events, with the product officially launching at the Game Fair today. CombiBreed™ health test packages for each breed can be ordered by visiting the Kennel Club Shop via https://www.thekennelclubshop.org.uk/products/combibreed-health-test-packages

Priced at £135 (with a 10% discount for Kennel Club Assured Breeders at £121.50), CombiBreed™ allows breeders cost-effective access to the most impactful genetic health tests without the need to carry out each one individually, with results that are easy to interpret. At present, the packages are available for the Labrador Retriever, French Bulldog, Cocker Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel, Golden Retriever, German Shepherd, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Beagle, Border Collie, Rough Collie, Chinese Crested and the Australian Shepherd.

The introduction of these new packages follows research, carried out earlier this year, which revealed that the number of pedigree dogs at risk of often painful and debilitating inherited diseases is being dramatically reduced by responsible breeders, thanks to the use of DNA tests. Researchers from the Kennel Club and the Animal Health Trust found that approximately ten years after each DNA test became available, the gene mutations that caused the diseases had decreased in each breed by a staggering 90 per cent or more.

Dr Tom Lewis, Kennel Club Genetics Research Manager said: “Our partnership with Weatherbys is a crucial step in improving dog health and will allow breeders to help positively impact future generations by ensuring dogs are health tested before breeding.

“The genetic tests that we have included in the Weatherbys CombiBreed™ packages are the result of work by the Kennel Club and Weatherbys to identify the most significant genetic diseases in individual breeds.

“The benefits of providing all relevant tests for each breed mean that puppy buyers can also feel assured that their puppy has been bred by a responsible breeder, whilst simplifying the process for breeders themselves.”

Nick Craven, Communications Director for Weatherbys, said: “We are delighted to strengthen our relationship with the Kennel Club through the development of genetic testing packages to the most popular dog breeds in the UK.

“Before, breeders had to navigate numerous laboratories to get results and interpret them to make informed breeding decisions.

“Our CombiBreed™ packages simplify this process. They are easy to purchase from the Kennel Club, the results are straightforward to understand, and they cost less than working with multiple labs.”

The partnership between the Kennel Club and Weatherbys brings together a combined heritage of nearly 400 years dedicated to animal registration and animal welfare, and through the provision of CombiBreed™ the two organisations are strengthening their legacy by continuing to improve the health and welfare of animals.

For more information on CombiBreed™ health tests packages visit the Kennel Club website: www.thekennelclub.org.uk/combibreed.

Kennel Club Responds to Control of Dogs Act Review

Following the committee review of the Control of Dogs (Scotland) Act 2010 (released Thursday 18th July 2019), the Kennel Club and Scottish Kennel Club have issued the following statement:

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We have long been calling for more effective implementation of the 2010 Act and welcome the review’s acknowledgment of the lack of available and consistent data, and the necessity of a central database. Enforcing the collection and sharing of data would enable us to better understand the problem and therefore inform preventative strategies which are actually effective.

“While we are pleased the review recommends that the Government undertakes a comprehensive review of all dog control legislation, in order for this to be effective it is essential that any new legislation is properly considered with views represented from across the wider dog welfare sector.

“For example, we would question the recommendation from the committee that local authorities should be given the power to create bylaws which ban dogs off the lead. Dogs require off-lead exercise and dog owners are legally required to provide a duty of care to their pet. Insufficient exercise can not only cause obesity and other types of illness, but also frustration which can lead to aggression, so this could be counterproductive.

“We are also concerned that reintroducing dog licences would be ineffective; potentially wasting time, money and resource. Our view is that irresponsible dog owners are unlikely to apply for a licence, this can be evidenced by looking at Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland where compliance rates are less than 50 per cent. We don’t believe that reintroducing dog licences would have any effect on responsible dog ownership, instead we would point to the committee’s recommendation of educational and awareness-raising resources.

“Overall, it’s essential that any new legislation is properly and broadly considered across the board, consulting all stakeholders, to better protect the public against dogs dangerously out of control, without compromising any individual dog’s welfare. We welcome further discussion with stakeholders, government and local authorities.”

CHANGES TO REGULATIONS IN RELATION TO EVENT LICENCES

Kennel Club Press Release:

The Kennel Club wishes to announce that the regulations regarding event licences across all disciplines are to be changed.

With immediate effect from 1 July 2019, event licence applications, whether for a show, trial or other competition, will cease to refer to ‘guarantors’. Instead, whenever a licence fee is paid for an event, the individual making the application on behalf of the club or society will agree that the officers and committee in place at the time of the event will assume full responsibility for ensuring that it will be conducted safely and in accordance with Kennel Club regulations.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “This change in regulations has come about due to the Kennel Club’s implementation of the Customer Relationship Management (CRM) database which will provide facilities for licence applications to be made online and which will remove any necessity for signatures to be provided. The principle of the licensing process will remain unchanged, but the term ‘guarantor’ will no longer be used.”

The relevant regulation changes across all disciplines will be published in due course.

Any enquiries regarding this matter can be directed to email wda@thekennelclub.org.uk.

Announcement: Obedience Liaison Council meeting 18 July 2019

The next meeting of the Kennel Club Obedience Liaison Council will be held at the Kennel Club in London on Thursday 18 July 2019. Proposals for inclusion on the agenda should reach the Obedience Liaison Council Secretary by 19 April.

Each eligible society or an individual may submit items for the agenda, through a council representative. Proposals must be concise and, if an amendment or an additional regulation is proposed, the regulation number must be given. All submissions must be signed by the society/individual and the representative.

All items for inclusion on the agenda should be sent to Working Dog Activities Team, The Kennel Club, Clarges Street, London W1J 8AB or by email to obedience@thekennelclub.org.uk.

A full list of Obedience Liaison Council representatives can be found at https://bit.ly/2Tx8YVk.

FAO MIDLANDS AREA OBEDIENCE COMPETITORS

A first for our region, myself, Nigel and Bev would like to meet with as any many of the competitors as possible the aim is to discuss the minutes of the last Obedience Liaison Council Meeting, but most importantly to hear the areas views which might even include potential proposals or discussion items for the next OLC meeting .

We appreciate that the Midlands region is a large area, so in order to achieve our goal, We have decided to go on tour!

So if you would like us to come to your dog club please get in touch to arrange a meeting.

Richard Burbidge-Grant

Midlands_flyer

APPROPRIATE CONTENT FOR HEELWORK TESTS IN OBEDIENCE

KENNEL CLUB ANNOUNCEMENT:

Please note this announcement replaces the one issued on January 30, 2019 regarding the same matter. Apologies for any confusion caused.

The Kennel Club would like to issue a clarification on the appropriate content for heelwork tests in obedience.

In the Descriptions and Explanatory Notes for Obedience Classes, Regulation G(c)4 stipulates which turns are permissible at each level. It also states that circles and arcs may be included as appropriate to each level.

Judges should note when designing tests that they should include heelwork in straight lines (except as provided for in the Introductory Class), which then facilitates turns of 90 degrees to the left and to the right. Tests must not consist solely of circles and arcs, although they may be included as part of the test.

More information on obedience can be found at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/activities/obedience. All enquiries should be directed to obedience@thekennelclub.org.uk.